April 21, 2021

Fish Oil Benefits Site

Get Best Information About Omega 3 and Fish Oils

Weight gain, weight problems common among childhood brain growth survivors

April 07, 2021 3 minutes read Source/Disclosures Released by: Disclosures: Van Schaik and van Santen report no appropriate financial disclosures. Please see the study for all other authors' appropriate monetary disclosures. ADD TOPIC TO EMAIL NOTIFIES Get an e-mail when brand-new posts are posted on Please provide your e-mail address to get an e-mail when…

April 07, 2021 3 minutes read Source/Disclosures Released by: Disclosures: Van Schaik and van Santen report no appropriate financial disclosures. Please see the study for all other authors’ appropriate monetary disclosures.

ADD TOPIC TO EMAIL NOTIFIES

Get an e-mail when brand-new posts are posted on

Please provide your e-mail address to get an e-mail when brand-new posts are published on.

CONTRIBUTED TO EMAIL SIGNALS

We were unable to process your demand. Please attempt once again later. If you continue to have this problem please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

Youth brain growth survivors have a high occurrence of considerable weight gain, overweight and weight problems, and modifications in BMI might show hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction, according to a research study released in Journal of Medical Oncology.

The findings, observed amongst kids without craniopharyngioma, highlight the requirement for more extreme endocrine monitoring and interventions to control weight and cut major risk for adverse metabolic health effects, such as cardiovascular morbidity, according to researchers.

Childhood brain tumor survivors have a high prevalence of significant weight gain, overweight and obesity. Information were derived from van Shaik J, et al. J Clin Oncol. 2021; doi:10.1200/ JCO.20.01765.”Other literature had actually previously revealed that there is a high frequency of obesity among childhood brain tumor survivors. Due to the fact that many previously reported brain growth cohorts consisted of patients with craniopharyngioma, which may considerably influence the general occurrence of weight gain, we were interested in the frequency of overweight and weight problems in a noncraniopharyngioma accomplice,” Jiska van Schaik, MSc, PhD trainee in pediatric endocrinology and oncology, and pediatric endocrinologist Hanneke van Santen, MD, PhD, both of Princess Màxima Center for Pediatric Oncology and Wilhelmina Children’s Healthcare facility at the University Medical Center Utrecht in the Netherlands, stated in a joint statement to Healio.

“In addition, attention has been concentrated on weight problems, however numbers on the occurrence of obese and significant weight gain in childhood brain growth survivors had actually not been reported in the past,” they continued.

Jiska van Schaik, MSc, PhD student

Jiska van Schaik The analysis by van Schaik, van Santen and associates consisted of 661 youth brain tumor survivors (typical age at medical diagnosis, 7.4 years; 53.8% male) from a formerly reported nationwide retrospective cohort in the Netherlands who were identified at age 18 years or more youthful with a brain tumor between 2002 and 2012, survived at least 2 years after diagnosis and had follow-up data on BMI at least 6 months after medical diagnosis.

Scientists excluded those who had craniopharyngioma and pituitary tumors.

They defined considerable weight gain as a boost in BMI greater than or equivalent to +2 basic deviation score (SDS) from diagnosis to most recent follow-up.

Mean follow-up was 7.3 ± 3.1 years.

Results showed 33.1% of survivors developed significant weight gain, obese or obesity. This included 70 (11.6%) survivors who established considerable weight gain during follow-up and 190 (28.7%) categorized as obese (20.3%) or overweight (8.5%) at most recent follow-up, with a mean BMI SDS of 2.6 ± 1 after mean follow-up of 7.8 ± 3.3 years.

Hanneke van Santen, MD, PhD

Hanneke van Santen”We were surprised that the frequency of weight gain and overweight is still so high in childhood brain growth survivors after exclusion of craniopharyngioma and pituitary tumors,” van Schaik and van Santen informed Healio.

Prevalence also appeared high in contrast with the basic Dutch population. Amongst 578 childhood brain growth survivors aged in between 4 and 20 years at follow-up, 20.3% classified as overweight, compared to 10.5% of their same-aged counterparts in the general population. The distinction appeared even greater among those in that age who categorized as obese (8.5% of survivors vs. 2.7% of general population).

“The weight problems prevalence is nearly 4 times increased in these kids,” van Schaik and van Santen said.

Greater possibility of obese or obesity at follow-up appeared related to greater vs. lower BMI SDS at diagnosis (OR = 2; 95% CI, 1.7-2.34), low-grade glioma vs. other brain growths (OR = 1.68; 95% CI, 1.05-2.67), presence vs. absence of diabetes insipidus throughout follow-up (OR = 6.41; 95% CI, 1.35-30.41) and presence vs. absence of main precocious puberty throughout follow-up (OR = 3.12; 95% CI, 1.38-7.04).

“Therefore, it appears to be that weight gain in childhood brain tumor survivors is more often connected to hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction than a lot of professionals are presently aware of,” van Schaik and van Santen said.

The research study’s restrictions consisted of the lack of a nationwide protocol for security of BMI and hypothalamic-pituitary in childhood brain growth survivors and that BMI does not separate between the quantity of fat mass, fat-free mass and muscle mass.

The scientists also admitted their definition of significant weight gain was relatively stringent.

“By using our cutoff point for weight gain of BMI +2 SDS, our outcomes might even have ignored the frequency of weight gain, and it is important for oncologists and endocrinologists to be aware of these metabolic changes throughout follow-up,” van Schaik and van Santen stated.

“Future studies are required to additional expose the reason for weight gain– be it hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction, dietary, reduced physical activity or genetic/environmental– and ought to include BMI of moms and dads and brother or sisters, monitor exercise and diet, and look into hereditary aspects,” they added.

To learn more:

Hanneke van Santen, MD, PhD, and Jiska van Schaik, MSc, can be reached at Department of Pediatric Endocrinology, Wilhelmina Children’s Hospital/Princess Màxima Center, PO Box 85090, 3508 AB, Utrecht, the Netherlands; email van Santen at h.m.vansanten@umcutrecht.nl; email van Schaik at j.vanschaik-3@umcutrecht.nl.

ADD SUBJECT TO EMAIL ALERTS

Get an e-mail when brand-new posts are published on

Please offer your e-mail address to receive an email when brand-new articles are published on.

CONTRIBUTED TO EMAIL ALERTS

We were not able to process your demand. Please attempt again later. If you continue to have this problem please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

Source